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sampajāno, pajānati


tags: pajanati, pajaanati, sampajano, sampajaa

from pali group discussion
In MN 119, mindfulness immersed in the body sutta, "walking, standing, 
sitting, lying down" is covered twice. Once under the section of 
postures with "pajÄ nati", and again in the next section of 
"sampajÄ nakÄ rÄ« " .

<snip>


So how are the differences to be understood, with respect to  
"walking/standing/sitting/lying" in "pajÄ nati" versus "sampajÄ nakÄ rÄ« "? 
My question on this is primarily motivated by how to fine tune 
meditation and satipatthana practice.

ven. Kumara responds:
I wondered about this for a long time, until I found out how the Buddha defined sampajana in SN 47:35:

And how, monks, is a monk clearly knowing?
Here, monks, a monk’s feelings are known when they arise, known when they remain present and known when they go away;
[his] thoughts are known when they arise, known when they remain present and known when they go away; 
[his] perceptions are known when they arise, known when they remain present and known when they go away.
It is in such a way, monks, that a monk is clearly knowing.
Monks, a mindful monk should dwell clearly knowing. This is our instruction to you.

So, it seems that sampajana refers to being aware of the activities of feelings, thoughts, and perceptions, while engaging in any physical activities.
..(in followup email) I take 'sam' here to mean as in sammaa, which can mean complete, full, proper, and I think proper fits in best here. [rather than as pajaanati being equivalent to sampajaana as asked in the email]

cst 4 via dpr has:

 satisuttaṃ n n (SN 47.35)

♦ 401. sāvatthinidānaṃ. “sato, bhikkhave, bhikkhu vihareyya sampajāno. ayaṃ vo amhākaṃ anusāsanī”.

♦ “kathañca, bhikkhave, bhikkhu sato hoti? idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhādomanassaṃ; vedanāsu ... pe ... citte ... pe ... dhammesu dhammānupassī viharati ātāpī sampajāno satimā, vineyya loke abhijjhādomanassaṃ. evaṃ kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu sato hoti.

♦ “kathañca, bhikkhave, bhikkhu sampajāno hoti? idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhuno viditā vedanā uppajjanti, viditā upaṭṭhahanti, viditā abbhatthaṃ gacchanti. viditā vitakkā uppajjanti, viditā upaṭṭhahanti, viditā abbhatthaṃ gacchanti. viditā saññā uppajjanti, viditā upaṭṭhahanti, viditā abbhatthaṃ gacchanti. evaṃ kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu sampajāno hoti. sato, bhikkhave, bhikkhu vihareyya sampajāno. ayaṃ vo amhākaṃ anusāsanī”ti. pañcamaṃ. 

b.bodhi translates 47.35 as:
At Sāvatthī. “Bhikkhus, a bhikkhu should dwell mindful and clearly comprehending. This is our instruction to you.
 
“And how, bhikkhus, is a bhikkhu mindful? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu dwells contemplating the body in the body … feelings in feelings … mind in mind … phenomena in phenomena, ardent, clearly comprehending, mindful, having removed covetousness and displeasure in regard to the world. It is in this way, bhikkhus, that a bhikkhu is mindful.
 
“And how, bhikkhus, does a bhikkhu exercise clear comprehension? Here, bhikkhus, for a bhikkhu feelings are understood as they arise, understood [181] as they remain present, understood as they pass away. Thoughts are understood as they arise, understood as they remain present, understood as they pass away. Perceptions are understood as they arise, understood as they remain present, understood as they pass away. It is in this way, bhikkhus, that a bhikkhu exercises clear comprehension. (176)
 
“Bhikkhus, a bhikkhu should dwell mindful and clearly comprehending. This is our instruction to you.”

(176):
This practice is described at MN III 124,10-20 (as a wonderful quality of the Buddha); at AN II 45,15-20 (as a development of concentration, also at DN III 223,9-17); at AN IV 32,24-33,2 (as a factor leading to the four paṭisambhidās ); and at AN IV 168,12-15 (as a practice of mindfulness and clear comprehension). Paṭis I 178-80 treats this practice in relation to mindfulness of breathing. Spk explains the feelings, thoughts, and perceptions as those that occur in relation to the sense bases and objects comprehended in developing insight.


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